Zoom is a security mess, and that has been proved over and over in the past few weeks. Last week, the company’s CEO, Eric S. Yuan, in a long blog post, admitted that the company has been lax on the security and privacy of its users and that they are “deeply sorry.”

In a recent report, Google has banned its employees from using Zoom’s teleconferencing platform citing its “security vulnerabilities.” The company waned that Zoom will stop working on their work laptops this week.

Besides, the German foreign ministry has also recently restricted the use of Zoom over the same. On Monday 6th, Zoom’s share plunged by 14.5 percent as the markets opened after several major organizations banned or discouraged the use of its videoconferencing app.

Heightening Problems

Despite the apology and several measures put into place to tighten their security, including freezing feature updates for three months, the company is now seeing a new wave of issues surrounding their security.

They even reiterated the plan on Wednesday, as if we had doubts over that – but, yeah, there’s always something to be fixed.

First, the company was sued for sharing personal data of its users with Facebook. Recently one of its investors has sued the company accusing it of hiding flaws in its teleconferencing app.

Improving Security and Privacy

In line with their promise to up their security, Zoom has recently rolled out security features. In a recent software update, Zoom now hides Meeting ID numbers from the title bar, so it won’t be shared in case you want to capture a screenshot.

Another update rolled out last week put an end to Zoombombing — where one crashes a Zoom meeting without being invited bombarding users with inappropriate content by enforcing the use of passwords and waiting rooms for meetings by default.

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