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Apple Recruiting Engineers to Work on 6G Wireless Technology

They will research and design next-generation (6G) wireless communication systems for radio access networks.


Apple is currently recruiting engineers to help develop 6G, the next generation of wireless technology that will take over 5G.

The job adverts posted on the company’s site say the engineers will “research and design next-generation (6G) wireless communication systems for radio access networks.” They will also take part in both industry and academic forums on the sixth generation of cellular networks.

“You will have the unique and rewarding opportunity to craft next-generation wireless technology that will have deep impact on future Apple products,“ the job advert states.

“In this role, you will be at the centre of a cutting-edge research group responsible for creating next-generation disruptive radio access technologies over the next decade.”

Apple wants to be part of the next-gen wireless technology in the early development stages to reduce reliance on other companies. Its first slew of 5G compatible iPhones, the iPhone 12 mini, iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro, and iPhone 12 Pro Max, rely on Qualcomm’s 5G modem to support the new wireless technology.

The company also delayed in rolling out 5G iPhones, only doing so a year or so after other smartphone makers had launched 5G devices. Despite launching the 5G iPhones in late 2020, the company wasn’t entirely late to the party after other makers, as the massive sales experienced suggested.

This is, however, not Apple’s first interest in 6G. Apple joined an alliance of firms developing 6G standards, among other next-gen cellular technologies in November 2020.

The Next G Alliance aims to help North America become a market leader when it comes to 6G. Other technology behemoths in the alliance include Google, LG Electronics, Cisco, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, and Intel.

6G is not expected to be commercialized until around 2030, according to industry watchers, and it’s not clear how it will be relative to 5G.

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Via
Bloomberg

Alvin Wanjala

Alvin is a freelance tech journalist. Talk to me via email at alvinwanjala[at]pm[dot]me

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